Tag Archive | Public sector

A Drama Out Of A Crisis

A tweet from Surrey’s Chief Constable Lynne Owens really struck me this morning. It said this:

“My officers & staff have been dealing with 3 high risk missing people overnight. The continual increase in these cases is concerning”

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Re-imagining Police Custody


A Home Office commissioned report has today said that about a quarter of a million vulnerable people are not receiving the support of an “appropriate adult” while in police custody.

A few months ago, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary published their report on “The Welfare Of Vulnerable People In Custody” which made clear the distance still to travel in terms of how police manage the vulnerable in their care. I blogged about this at the time in a missive called One Size Fits All. The point of the title was to draw attention to the fact that custody suites are designed to be generic buildings with little to no provision for anyone with any form of vulnerability. A cell is a cell is a cell.

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At All Costs 

Over the last few days the issue of what cuts to police budgets might mean has finally gained some traction in the media.

First we had Merseyside CC Sir Jon Murphy speaking plainly and honestly about what the re-structure of the force would look like:

“We will not deliver as good as service as we have done before. In some instances it will take us longer to get there. In some cases we won’t turn up. That’s an inevitable consequence of having less people to do more work.”

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Critical Mass

There are two stories today which suggest that public services are struggling to cope with demand.

The first refers to the “sheer volume” of cases being referred to MARAC meetings. (Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference – these try and get as many organisations together as possible so there is a co-ordinated response to high risk domestic violence cases.)

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One Door 

The publication of the CQC report on mental health care provision (Right Here Right Now) very clearly demonstrated that there simply isn’t enough of it. Not only is there not enough of it but those who end up dealing with it instead are neither properly equipped or trained to do so. The current system is nowhere even close to being able to deal with demand and the overall outcome is that people in crisis are being knocked from pillar to post when they are at their most vulnerable. When they are not at their most vulnerable, there is nothing in place to help them from reaching that point in the future.

The organisations charged with either providing this care as their primary role and those who fill in the widening gaps are struggling to cope and whilst this is a source of massive frustration across the board it is those in crisis who are suffering the most.

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